Archive for January, 2010

Valencia Train Station

Sunday, January 24th, 2010

During a recent trip to Spain I had the pleasure of passing through Valencia train station. The train station may not be the biggest train station in the world but it is definitely one of the most charming stations I have ever traveled through. The impressive mosaic tiles and detailed typography in some of the signage really helped me kill time as I waited to board the train.

A wood craved ticket sales counter with mosaic tiles

A wood craved ticket sales counter with mosaic tiles

Impressive mosaics on the walls around the customer service office

Impressive mosaics on the walls around the customer service office

Cool typography craved into the wood spelling out 'Norte'

Cool typography craved into the wood spelling out 'Norte'

Another example of nice typography in mosaic, 'Pleasant Journey'

Another example of nice typography in mosaic, 'Pleasant Journey'

The detail within the clock face is impressive but the mosaic designs that frame it are even more impressive. Check out the mosaic ceiling top right also.

The detail within the clock face is impressive but the mosaic designs that frame it are even more impressive. Check out the mosaic ceiling top right also.

Cool Industrial Design – A Folding Plug

Tuesday, January 19th, 2010

Here’s a cool piece of industrial design, a Folding Plug for Irish and UK users of electronic devices.

Photography of Adam Jahiel

Thursday, January 7th, 2010

I rediscovered the photography of Adam Jahiel after reading through some of my old research books. This particular project, The Last Cowboy, his amazing composition of big skies, and cowboys working with the horses in the Great Basin, the rugged West of the United States really does make for captivating viewing. Jahiel writes on his website about the project – “…the cowboy tradition has its roots in the oldest of human conflicts: man against nature and man against himself.” The atmosphere of the photography below is wonderful reflection of the dying art of ranching in America. You can order some of his prints here.

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El Caballo – A Traditional Craft Merged with Innovative Design

Wednesday, January 6th, 2010

The original workshop located in Arenal Quarter near the bull ring in Seville, El Caballo is a design label that grew from the Spanish equestrian world. A family run firm in business since 1892, El Caballo remains true to tradition by using old age techniques – like using natural vegetable-tanned cowhide cured without chemical agentswhile also embracing new innovative design. Their expertise in all things equestrian and leather has allowed El Caballo and their Creative Director Nicholas Vandelet make an impact in the fashion world, recently winning a L’Oreal award.

El Caballo staff were friendly and kind enough to show me a functioning workshop adjacent to the shop floor – as seen below. It was amazing to see the different techniques used to make the excellent products on display in the shop. I’m sure their designs will hit Irish shops in the near future.

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El Caballo Traditional Equestrian Products on Display in the Shop

El Caballo Traditional Equestrian Products on Display in the Shop

Sorolla’s Vision of Spain

Tuesday, January 5th, 2010

While in Valencia I took the chance to see A Vision of Spain: The Hispanic Society of America Collection by Valencian artist Joaquín Sorolla y Bastida.

The show features fourteen murals from different regions of Spain between 1912-1919, which portrays the people, customs and culture of various Spanish regions at the time. The work was commissioned by Archer Milton Huntington – the founder of the Hispanic Society of New York.

Huntington commissioned the work for the Hispanic Society’s reading gallery and had envisioned the murals to depict a history of Spain but Sorolla convinced him of a representation of the various regions at the time rather than a history of Spain. Sorolla traveled to each region painting models posed in local costume involved in the local landscape and culture. Up close, the colours of the murals were amazing, especially how Sorolla captured the light on the water. His preliminary sketches were equally as impressive. Unfortunately we were not allowed to photograph inside the exhibition but you can check out Sorolla’s complete works here.

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